Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar
Kellar

Kellar Headline Condensed

Styles : Regular, Italic
Year : 2019
Glyphs : 813
Available for purchase

Kellar was named after the multi-talented Thomas MacKellar (1812-99), associate owner of one of the nineteenth-century leading American type foundries: MacKellar, Smiths and Jordan (MS&J). Not only was he a published author and poet who came to manage the composing room floor, but he also was the founding editor of the Typographic Advertiser, M&SJ’s house organ. MacKellar introduced the practice of composing humorous riffs to print as sample text in specimen books. Kellar started as a synthesis of various Condensed Titles cuts found in MS&J’s Printers’ handy book of specimens (1871). Incorporating the typical high contrast and narrowness of Didot-like fashion typefaces, Kellar stands as a quirky outsider, with it’s organic lowercases, expressive figures and emphasized oval structure. The homonymous Harry Kellar – a 19th century American magician, predecessor of Harry Houdini – was yet another source of inspiration for this typeface: reviving the heydays of Victorian era letterpress posters into contemporary editorial typography. As a nod to the period, Kellar embed a specific alternate form of “G” found on an antique circus poster as well as several other alternates. Eying specific Scotch Roman’s characteristics and fully equipped with “almost-too-long-serifs”, Kellar is cut out for distinctive, bizarre headlines.

Kellar Specimen